LiveJournal DDoS: An Actual Internet Human Rights Violation

Over the last few weeks I’ve been blogging about Andre Vrignaud’s data capping internet shutoff, and whether or not that could be construed as a human rights violation.  Most people seem to be of the opinion that it’s really pushing a button that doesn’t need to be pushed (the human rights card?).  But here’s something that is in fact an actual violation of human rights: the LiveJournal DDoS attack that’s happening right now.

You may or may not know about LiveJournal.  It was one of the early blogging platforms to come out in 1999 right around when blogging was the thing and Facebook didn’t exist.  But unlike other blogging platforms, LiveJournal was much more social.  You could add friends who also had LJ accounts.  You could join groups.  When you posted an update it could be made totally public, available to a group, available to all your friends, available to a customized list of your friends, or only available to yourself.  That level of granular sharing detail is unheard of in the world of blogging.  Hell, it’s unheard of on Facebook!  Only in Google+ do you get that level of customizable content sharing, and even that only started about a month ago!  LJ has been doing this for over a decade, because they understand that you don’t always want to post things to the entire world.

LiveJournal was purchased several years ago by a company called SUP, which is based in Russia.  LiveJournal had been a very global company in general prior to that, and Russian activity on LJ was very high.  Today, over 80 of the top 100 Russian bloggers use LJ professionally.

And that is a problem to the Russian government.  Many of these bloggers are extremely vocal about political corruption in Russia and they use LJ to call people out.

For the last few weeks the entirety of LiveJournal has been assaulted by a Distributed Denial of Service attack.  From what the folks at LJ can surmise, this is a direct attempt to silence bloggers who are critical of the Russian government.  The impact of this is not just on Russian bloggers though, it is effecting everyone who uses LiveJournal as a blogging platform.  Numerous friends of mine have reported frustration and site outages for days.  Unfortunately you can’t even get to the site news, because of the outage.  The LiveJournal staff have had to make site outage announcements via Twitter and Facebook.

Let’s go back to the UN Special Rapporteur’s report on the internet and human rights.  This is from the section IV.E on “cyber attacks”:

The Special Rapporteur is deeply concerned that websites of human rights organizations, critical bloggers, and other individuals or organizations that disseminate information that is embarrassing to the State or the powerful have increasingly become targets of cyber-attacks. 81. When a cyber-attack can be attributed to the State, it clearly constitutes, inter alia, a violation of its obligation to respect the right to freedom of opinion and expression. Although determining the origin of cyber-attacks and the identity of the perpetrator is often technically difficult, it should be noted that States have an obligation to protect individuals against interference by third parties that undermines the enjoyment of the right to freedom of opinion and expression.

It’s unclear whether or not this is an act being perpetrated by the Russian government, but the article linked from Time magazine at the head of this piece strongly implies that it’s the most likely candidate. Especially since Russian political candidates are gearing up for next year’s election cycle, and that an attack upon LiveJournal, the country’s most powerful blogging service, could lead readers to question the credibility of the bloggers.

But whether or not this is in fact perpetrated by the state, the DDoS attack is effecting the most powerful voice of the Russian people, one that is unmediated by the government.  By taking the site down, the hackers are silencing critics of the government, and that is a violation of freedom of speech.  By extension they are also taking down the rest of the users of the system who live in other countries, including my friends and myself here in the US.

Yes, I have a LiveJournal account, and I have had one since 2002.  In fact, I have two!  When I moved to DC LJ was the only way I was able to stay connected with the vast majority of my friends around the country (Cincinnati, Seattle, Philadelphia, New York).  I have thousands of entries on LiveJournal, and still use it for personal blogging and occasional creative writing.  I started this WordPress blog for professional purposes, because I do believe in having a public and private face, though my private side is very publicly accessible.  The WordPress is strictly for me to write about libraries, technology and apparently legal issues therefrom.  The LJ is where I talk about my religion, social activism, my family, my vacations, and other juicy, intimate details that no one from my workplace ought to know about (those are hidden to my LJ friends only).

Am I claiming a human rights violation because LJ is being DDoS’d and I can’t write about my Frappuccino?  No.  I’m claiming that this the DDoS attack that LJ is currently undergoing is most likely a result of someone trying to silence critics of the Russian government, and THAT should be considered a violation according to the document released by the U.N.  I just happen to be an innocent bystander caught in the crossfire, along with over 31 million other bloggers.

The question now is, if this is in fact a human rights violation, how does one stop it?  How do you stop a DDoS attack?  Since this is directed against a very specific web service, is the UN obligated to try to do something to help LiveJournal?  Are they going to investigate the Russian government?  Sadly, I don’t think anything is really going to come of it.  Users will continue to get error messages and see Frank the Goat eating their posts until the hackers give up. If it is an attack coordinated by the state, that probably won’t let up until long after the elections are over, if then.

All I can do is sigh…

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3 comments on “LiveJournal DDoS: An Actual Internet Human Rights Violation

  1. Patrick Rady says:

    This makes a lot more sense… this seems like it is a human rights violation.

    How does one stop it? You probably don’t- sadly.

  2. I may change my opinion about the internet being a human right.

    When I first asked myself if I considered the DDoS attack on LJ a human rights violation I compared it to shutting down a newspaper. I tend to think of human rights as basic rights to not be beat up, not be imprisoned without just cause, and basic food clothing and shelter.
    But according to the UN http://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/ Article 19: “Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.”

    So, newspapers and the internet are both human rights as far as the UN is concerned. The government shutting down a newspaper is a human rights violation. Although a newspaper closing for financial reasons is not a human rights violation.

    The thing about newspapers and the internet as human rights is that while it may be a human rights violation for the government to shut them down it is not a human rights violation for an individuals not to have access to them for some reason. For instance you can lose access if you don’t pay for it. Or your right to free expression does not mean that your newspaper has to publish all your letters.

    The LiveJournal Status update page is hosted by another site http://status.livejournal.org/
    “The nomadic ninja goat herders guarding the servers currently report no site-wide problems. ~Status Updated: 2:05 am GMT (Friday, July 29)”

  3. Null says:

    This is a freedom of speech issue, and freedom of speech is indeed a human right.

    The fact that some speech takes place on the Internet (or in a newspaper) does not mean that Internet access (or newspaper publication) is a human right. LiveJournal users who have posted their speech online have obviously obtained their own Internet access, so it is the attempt to silence their speech via DDoS attack that violates their human rights.

    The first order of business is to determine who is responsible for the DDoS attack. If it isn’t the Russian government then the government which has jurisdiction over the perpetrators needs to prosecute them. If it’s a national government then the UN is really the only organization designed to do anything about it, but the UN is so weak and worthless that I doubt anything would happen in that scenario.

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